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Sievers' from Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

Sievers' from Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

Jolene_Buck (View posts)
Posted: 13 Mar 2001 6:23PM GMT
Edited: 14 Jan 2002 5:13AM GMT
Am looking for relatives of Johann (John) and Magdalena K. Wieck Sievers, married in Germany Jan 15, 1848. Johann died in 1861. Johann died 5 May 1861 and was buried in Germany. Magdalena was born 27 Jan 1823, died 18 Nov. 1909. Also looking for information on Claus Sievers, son of Claas and Trincka Sievers. Claas was born 22 Feb 1806.

Sievers

Steven Kadera (View posts)
Posted: 15 Jun 2001 6:48AM GMT
I have a few Claus Sievers' in my collection.
Rendsburg and Luhnstedt are the primary areas.
My data goes back to mid 1700 but not the dates you mention.
If I can help let me know.

Steven Kadera
Holmen, Wi

Sievers

Steven Kadera (View posts)
Posted: 15 Jun 2001 6:49AM GMT
I have a few Claus Sievers' in my collection.
Rendsburg and Luhnstedt are the primary areas.
My data goes back to mid 1700 but not the dates you mention.
If I can help let me know.

Steven Kadera
Holmen, Wi

Re: Sievers' from Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

thekrucks (View posts)
Posted: 14 Jul 2001 5:31AM GMT
Edited: 27 Oct 2001 5:13AM GMT
Surnames: SIEVERS, KRUCK
Hi Jolene,
My gg grandmother, Rebecca SIEVERS, had a sister, Magdelena. Rebecca was born 10th January 1831 in Elmshorn, Schleswig Holstein. From the information I havem they also had a brother, Hinrich. If you think this is the same Magdelena, please let me know!

Regards
Carl KRUCK

Re: Sievers' from Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

Jolene_Buck (View posts)
Posted: 11 Aug 2001 2:14AM GMT
Edited: 14 Jan 2002 5:13AM GMT
to Carl Kruck:
My Magdalena was born January 27, 1823 in Holstein and died November 18, 1909. She came to America in 1873. I have no other information about her past or who her brothers and/or sisters were

Re: Sievers in S-H and Claus Sievers

Gary Dufel (View posts)
Posted: 15 Oct 2002 8:07PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Sievers
My Sievers family database has several Clas/Claus names in it. The family goes back to about 1670 in Haale and the nearby towns of Schenefeld, Todtenbuttel, Kuden, Beldorf, and Lütgen Westedt (Lütjenwestedt). These are not terribly far from Rendsburg.

The Clas/Claus names are as follows:

1. Clas b. 1856 m. Maria Thomsen; his parents: Jurgen Carstens Sievers and Abel Schluter
2. Claus, b. 1740; parents - Hans Sievers and Trienke Stuhmer
3. Claus, b. 1775, m. Antje Martha Johannsen; his parents - Hans Sievers, Anna Margretha Teden
4. Claus, b. 1852 parents: Johann Sievers and Marike Gathje
5. Claus Johan. b. 1817 parents Claus Sievers(b 1775) and Antje Micheelsen
6. Claus Johann, b. 1815 brother of number 5

Re: Sievers in S-H

Joye Sievers (View posts)
Posted: 19 Sep 2003 3:13PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Sievers
Hello Gary, I have just begun working with my husbands line and have it beginning with Fredrick William Sievers b:1800 d: Sept. 23, 1863 and Wilhelmina Christine Ostertog b:1800 d; Sept.27, ?, both died in Galena Ill. They arrived in the US aboard the Borussia on Oct. 18, 1860 with 3 of their 6 children. I am assuming they were from the Hamburg area as that is where the ship sailed from.

Any chance of the lines connecting? I know the probability is zero, but just have to ask to follow all leads. Joye

Re: Sievers in S-H

Gary Dufel (View posts)
Posted: 19 Sep 2003 10:28PM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Sievers
Regretfully, I do not have this name in my database.

Re: Sievers in S-H

joyesievers (View posts)
Posted: 20 Sep 2003 12:54AM GMT
Classification: Query
Thank you Gary. Joye

Re: Sievers' from Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

Mark Sievers (View posts)
Posted: 20 Apr 2004 12:21AM GMT
Classification: Query
Surnames: Sievers, Stamp, Schutz, Krusemark, Krusmark, Mather
Here's a really long winded reply ...

Magdalena Katherine Sievers (Wick) was my gg grandmother. She's sometimes referred to as Lena or Maggie, but usually used Katherine.

In German naming customs, children were given two names -- one a baptismal/christening name (usually the first name and often the child's patron saint) and the other (usually the 2d name) a "daily use" name. For example, my father was Harry Paul Sievers, but when by "Paul" while he lived in Yutan.

I don't know how much of this you already know ...

She came to America in 1873 with her two sons -- Mark (also spelled Marx b. 8-22-1853, d. 7-10-1927) and Jacob (also known as "Jake" b. 5-7-1861 d. 3-7-1918) -- and her 3 daughters -- Weibke, Frauke (also called Frankie) and Margaretha.

The family settled in Yutan, Nebraska. Married into Schulz, Krusemark (also spelled Krusmark from Pender Nebraska) and Stamp families. I have the details if you'd like them.

This is a very helpful website from Saunder's county:

www.rootsweb.com/~nesaunde/1983hist/famnames2.html#S

The cemetary transcript that contains Katherine's children and many decendants is at the Hollst-Lawn site

www.rootsweb.com/~nesaunde/cemetery/hollst.html

The statute of the angel pointing to heaven is near where Jacob, Mark and Magdalena are buried.

The farm she and her sons lived on is shown here:

www.rootsweb.com/~nesaunde/1907plat/images/plat-pg74.jpg

It's the plat just west of Yutan.

According to Katherine Sievers' deathrecord at the Lutheran chuch in Yutan, she was born in Jevenstedt, Schleswig-Holstein. Her husband, Johann is buried in Westermahalen, Rendsburg, Schlesweig-Holstein.

Katherine was Johann's 2d wife. His first wife was Catherine Storm (b 5-21-1809, d 8-24-1847). They had three children, all of whom died without issue.

I know nothing about Katherine's ancestors.

My research had Johann's ancestors is as follows:

Parents: Johann (b. 9-9-1753, d 5-18-1817)
Antje ???
5 children: Johann, Abel, Peter, Anna, Gretje
Weibke Ohm was his first wife, but she and her child died in 1795 or 96. Note that in some dialects, "Weibke" is the German version of "Goodwife", so be careful when attributing "Weibke" to anyone as a first name.

G Parents: Simon Sievers (b ???, d. 1-3-1810)
Weibke Holsten (probably means "Goodwife from Holstein," so I'm not sure this name means much)

Schleswig-Holstein was part of Denmark until 1866 after a Prussia-Denmark war. For geneaology purposes, that means that many families from that area practiced the Danish custom of patrynomic naming, which could mean that surnames changed every generation (e.g., Carl, Carlsen). In theory, Schleswig-Holstein required fixed surnames after 1771, but additional decrees were issued as late as the 1820s. In addition, the practice of naming people after their occupations or the region they came from was also common (see the Weibke Holsten, name above).

The best reference on the complications of German research is the LDS site:

www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rg.asp?Dest=G1&a...

Regards
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